DIY balance/contact board

Making a training board isn’t really hard and not expensive. Here is another diy-tipp from me.
I bought a shelf which is 300 wide. (how long is depending on dogs size), a yoga matt and furniture pads. I already have a small balance pad from before. So I cutted the yoga matt in the same size as the board (a little longer, so it’s over the edges), I glued it on, put the furniture pads at the end on the underside and that’s it. Waiting until the glue has dried.
I used the Yoga mat because it’s made for not slipping. It’s also possible to use carpet or bathing mats.
I want to use it for pre-teeter training. Tadaa should get confident with the movement under her paws. It’s also possible to use it for balancing. Happy diy – time 😉

Happy Birthday Tvitvi

Three years ago my little surprise was born. I wasn’t sure if I would have a puppy until this day, I remember it like yesterday. When Jan Egil showed her picture to our friends and said «This will be our new dog».

Tvitvi was my first small dog and my first Papillon. I fell in love with her the first time I saw her. She was small, fluffy, confident, funny and biting us all the time. After some time she got also really cudely. I remember watching her while she was sleeping and even telling Jan Egil that she is just the sweetest creature on this earth.

In 2017 we travelled a lot. From Czech, Austria, Germany, France, Northern Norway. Little Tvitvi was an easy and fun traveling companion. Afraid of anything, facing every adventure together with us. She made so many friends, and I think she made quite an impression to some people too.

She was so unbelievable clever and motivated. I had so much fun training with her, I had to take myself back to do not too much. But we had so much fun together.

I remember her warm body rolled together on my lap, she always chose to sleep in contact with me.

And then on january 21. in 2018 the accident happened… I still can’t talk about this day. Only that it broke my heart. I still can’t understand why this most innocent soul had to leave us so early.

I’m thankful for all the nice memories we could share in the short time we had together. I’m forever thankful to Elli, her breeder, who gave her to me. I’m also thankful to Elli and Rebecca, the owner of Tvitivs sister Funny, for becoming my friends.

Fast as the wind, brave as a lion, beautiful like the midnight sky.
I miss you. Every day. My beloved Tvitvi.

When and how do we end?

In general we read and discuss a lot how and when we should start Agility with our dogs. When it’s healthy to put that kind of pressure on a young dogs body. If you ask 50 persons about that topic I guess you will get 45 different answers. But shouldn’t we ask ourselves when and how to end an Agility dogs career too?

We know agility is an extreme sport for some dogs . Extreme movements, extreme speed, extreme pressure but also extreme fun. When I started Agility about 17 years ago preventing injuries with warm-up, cool-down, special training for building up muscles but also chiropractic treatments were no topic at all. Luckily we learned a lot in the past years. But even though we are wiser and try hard that injuries won’t happen, accidents can happen.

My thoughts about when and how to retire a dog from Agility

My Belgian Shepherd Jamjam is now 9,5 years old. She’s a quite big dog who has a lot of energy. I do run agility with her because we both love it, but how much do I love it? The whole season I was at a point where I don’t feel we need to compete but simply should enjoy it. After our national championships in June we had a long summer break. The stomache disease in Norway made it not possible to go after my plan and start competing and training again in autumn. And then we were at a routine check at my vet who is treating our dogs with chiropractics. And she told me Jammi has never been in better shape. She usually tempts to be a little stiff in the back, but I always keep a dialogue with my vet if she would recommend to stop with the sport.

So the good news. She has never been in better shape. The bad news, this really made me think. Is it still worth it? I really love Jammi. And Agility is not so important that I would risk her well being.

I already retired two dogs from Agility. My first dog Bubu had to end all kind of sports because of arthrose at a young age of seven. He made me learn the hard way. Pipi was retired in a slow way. She had her last competition when she was 9. We stopped because I was focusing on Jammi and Jan Egil, who ran some competitions with her, tried to focus on his own dog. Pipi is twelve now, happy, healthy and grumpy as always.

So how I wish to end an agility career is not because I have to, but because I want to and because it feels right.

With Jammi I feel it’s getting closer to end this chapter. I want to run some jumping courses (only suited for ponies 😉 ), maybe compete a little, but I think it’s ok to stop. We luckily have much more together than just Agility, and I hope we have many more healthy years together to enjoy all these things in life.

Competition in November since our summer break.

HalliGallis first competition

Jan Egil was going to be judging in Denmark two weeks after Halli would be old enough to compete, and my plan was longer to try if we can be ready for at least competing in jumping.

We entered anyway both, agility and jumping. I took the chance to train the competition set-up and see if he is influenced by the surroundings. I made my own little courses in the Agility runs.

One month ago I kind of got a reminder that I really need to step up Hallis slalom training if I want to get it ready. So I needed more system. Ups and downs made me almost give up, but then I changed a little in our system and suddenly he got it. A mix between understanding and learning to fail made him concentrate and understand what to do.

What I did? We trained channel since spring, he loved the speed and that he could control it himself. He early had a really nice focus forward. But as soon as I started to close the channel more and more he hurried too much. So last step was to take a part with 4 poles from the normal weaves and let him try to adapt the movement he learned to only a small part. This we did beside channel which was almost closed. After he understood 4 I tried to add two more, and two more and from 8 I went to 12 which was no problem. It seems that this last step helped him to really understand his job.

I’m really proud of Halli and what he could show at our first competition together. He is growing with each run and we both want more.

Tadaa was joining her first agility trip. She got to stay in the hall, we played and did some tricks, greeted people and she took a nap next to the ring. She’s such an easy puppy and I enjoy her funny and positive temper.

Focus – with a little help from evolution

Teaching focus is fundamental in dog training. Sometimes we need our dogs to focus on us, which is quite easy to achieve with calling them. But in some cases we want them to focus away from us. We want a dog who is focused on obstacles and understands it’s task.

Something we teach our puppies is focusing on toys (or food). We teach them not to stare at us, but focusing on an object.

Use science

So why not help ourselves with evolution? There has been behavior studies on communication between humans and dogs. For example pointing somewhere when we want the others attention going there. Tests with chimpanzees & humans and dogs & humans show that chimps don’t understand what we want to tell with pointing somewhere, but dogs do. Their attention goes to where we point. It’s really interesting that dogs can read this sign, since they can’t communicate in this way with each other. I guess that’s the reason why showing with our arms where to go is so natural for our dogs. We can adapt this behavior for tricky starts too. We teached our dogs to focus where we point on command, so if the dog should start away from us we can help us with the focus command.

Interested? Read more about this study

DIY Yummie treats

Since Halli wasn’t much into food or treats when he was a puppy I had to try something else. This is a recipe for easy dog treats I got from a friend I would like to share.

What you need:
2 packages grounded chicken
2 eggs
2dl potato starch
2dl oats
1,5 dl water

Mix all ingredients together in a cooking machine or by hand. Let it sit for 10 minutes. Put it in a bread pan and bake it one hour with 175°C.
After you took it out of the oven let it cool down. You can also wait a day. Cut it in small pieces, use it fresh, freeze it or put them in a drying machine.

Handtarget- how to start

One of the first lessons I teach my dog is a strong hand-target. This is a basic lesson for many different techniques. I for example use hand target for teaching an «in» command or to teach rear-crosses.

This is how I want my hand target to look like. The toy in my other hand has high value, but Halli learned that he only gets it when he keeps his nose on my hand.

To learn the hand target I make it first easy for my puppy to touch my hand with putting food there.

I only treat from the hand the dog should touch, even though I later might hold the toy or treat in the other hand to try to make a «distraction». I also try not to put the hand toward the dog, he needs to find it.

First weeks with Tadaa

Tadaa has been in our family for three weeks now. I’m already in love with this funny little girl. She is really polite with our other dogs, happy for meeting new people and loves to play with Halli.

During the days we focus on getting a bond, as this is most important for me. We do this with a lot of playing, some clicker training and a lot of cuddeling. Tadaa is a confident little girl who likes to go her own ways. So here we have our main focus for now. Call-ins and letting her know that I’m fun too 😉